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20121201
20121201
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've been keeping my own naughty and nice lists for washington. >> warner: the president chose a seasonal setting, a toy factory in hatfield, pennsylvania, and holiday imagery to press again for extending tax cuts for the middle class. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1. i mean, i... i'm assuming that doesn't sound too good to you. >> no. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> warner: in washington, republicans portrayed the road trip as so much humbug, at a time, they said, when negotiations are going nowhere. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. >> warner: house speaker john boehr said republicans
in washington and we go off the fiscal cliff? what happens to medicare? what happens to the beneficiaries? >> well, we're going to have a very big whack at the system. the important point is it's not going to be strategic. that's not a very good thing. it's not just medicare benef beneficiaries. in the sequestration, lots of other programs get hit. so you've got to be very careful, here, plus the republicans constantly say we don't want to become like greece. what's driving off the fiscal cliff look like? it makes us look completely irresponsible as if we can't control our own spending and put in order some priorities. >> so some health care will be suffering? >> that's absolutely true. we want to incentive doctors ask hospitals to keep people well. not to just do procedures. and that's the key to really transforming medicare. >> i want to show you a map of the states that are refusing to implement the insurance exchanges. it's rather interesting. the other states are either implementing the exchanges or haven't decided to do that. if states don't decide to do it and the federal governmen
, and there are two types of people in washington. those who really enjoy detailed discussion about senate procedure, and those who don't. welcome. i can see which category you fit into. we have a great panel today to discuss something that's become more and more important moving forward, especially in the current nature of congress where the lines seem to be more and more stark and obvious than as any time as i've been in washington. we have four experts discussing the developments in --cepsbly the filibuster, but the discussion will touch on other areas of senate procedure and precedent, and you'll see a distinction between the two, senate rules and senate precedence on the other. you'll hear from four individuals who have a depth of experience in these matters that, i think, is unrivaled in the city. i'll introduce them briefly so they can turn it over to the discussion. i'll lead off with no particular order, james walden speaking first, working in the house of representatives and the senate, serving as the senate hearing committee. he's an adjunct professor in the department of politics in the
the party line seemed to be more stark and obvious than they were then some of my early days in washington. we have four experts who will discuss the developments and essentially the filibuster. it has to do with senate procedure and presidents and senate rules and senate precedents on the other. you're going to hear from for individuals with a depth of experience in these matters. let me introduce everyone. in no particular border, we have james wallner from guesswork for the house and the senate and he currently serves as executive director and an adjunct professor in the congressional and presidential studies program he has a masters and phd in politics. james is a very astute observer in this senate. i can tell you from first-hand experience. the second speaker will be norman ornstein. he is a long-term observer of politics and he is an analyst at cbs news. he is the author of several books, which you may have read. the broken branch, how congress is failing america, and the permanent campaign of the future, and most recently, it's even worse than it looks, the new politics of extremis
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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